My diagnosis . .

2014 was one of the best years of my life. I backpacked across Europe with one of my good friends and even made new friends. I witnessed two my of my longtime friends getting married to the loves of their lives. And I was in the best shape of my life and completed a Mudderella!! Life was good, life is good.  It wasn’t until late August during a jog I noticed pain in my right hip, this injury forced me to stop running. Once I stopped running, I wasn’t as energetic, couldn’t sleep, became very stressed and anxious frequently. I thought it was all because I stopped exercising. Then my stomach started hurting, a lot . .

For some reason I believe having frequent stomach pain is normal, just a typical day in my life. After my gallbladder was removed at the age of 25, I knew I would still have to suffer for many years to come.  Pain became apart of my life. I didn’t think anything wrong with waking up in the middle of the night from stomach pain or having frequent diarrhea. I just popped some antacids and drank ginger ale, daily. Then one morning I woke up from pain, used the restroom and saw blood. At first I thought my period started early, but the blood wasn’t consistent. Then another day I saw more blood, darker blood.  I thought  . . . yeah I should go see a doctor. Made an appointment with a GI  and told him my symptoms.  His response was, we gotta go inside to figure out what’s going on.

My first colonoscopy.  At the prime age of 28 on December 30, 2014 I walked into the capital digestive medical center, and quickly noticed I was the youngest person by 30 years. I thought i was in the wrong office by the looks I received, but then the receptionist welcomed me by name before I said hello. Shortly after, I was taken back to change,  got my IV, and waited. . . I was bored and uncomfortable.  Hearing the unconscious 70 year old man passing gas to my left and when he awoke, I listened to the awkward conversation this elderly man had with the male nurse. The male nurse asked him for martial advice since he was recently divorced. WTF?!? lol I was over it, and hungry!   Finally!! I was taken to the operation room. I was glad to see a familiar face. My GI asked how I was and stated “Let’s hope you have IBS or just hemorrhoids, fingers crossed!”, and to count to ten. 1 . . 2 . . . 3 . . .

I slowly opened my eyes  hearing people talking over me, talking about what they found. I tried to listen carefully but could only comprehend the last thing that was said, “and we found evidence of colitis”, then I heard a gasp from an older woman saying, “aww poor thing”.  When I  was fully awake and sipping my ginger ale, my GI appeared with a worried look on his face and told me you have colitis, and we’re going to put you on prescriptions for the next six months, we’re going to get you healthy.  . .

It’s been almost three weeks since the procedure. I’m taking two medications for my colitis in addition to another prescription, a total of 6 pills a day.  Not fun at all . . and the side effects has me feeling exhausted. The crazy thing is that I was relieved when I found out I have this disease because I knew I was sick, and there was no way that stress from my current job was the sole cause. It’s not like I’m saving lives . . but I knew something was wrong.

So now I am beginning this new life with an IBD, Ulcerative ColitisDiagnosis is now unknown at the moment, but I do have IBD.  (Date: 3/21/15) Now I’ve been told I have Crohn’s Disease, that might change again, who knows!!! (Date: 9/23/15). Back to Ulcerative Colitis, sighs  . .  (Date: 4/24/17).